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Friday, September 7, 2012

Vote for CRY America to with Chase Grant between $10,000 and $250,000. Vote now!

CRY America - Chase Community Grant
CRY
Make your vote count for CRY America
The 2012 Chase Community Giving Program
has nominated CRY America as an elibible charity for a grant. CRY America needs your vote to win a Chase Community Grant between $10,000 and $250,000. We estimate that we will need atleast 5000 to win this grant. Your vote counts. Vote now!
facebook    
Step 1:
Click here to go to the CRY America page on Chase Community Giving Facebook app. You can cast two votes for two charities
Step 2:
Click on 'green' vote tab
and allow the application
to cast one of your votes for CRY America
Step 3:
Earn an extra vote for CRY America by clicking on ‘send’ button or link below the vote tab
 
Step 4:
Chase customers, please avail of the two additional votes for CRY America at chase.com/ChaseGiving
Step 5:
Request friends, family and colleagues to vote for CRY America by sharing the link
on your facebook page
 
Incase, the link in step 1 fails, click here to go to the Chase Community Giving app page on facebook and type in ‘CRY America’ in the search tab and continue with step 2.
Over the last ten years, thanks to the support of people like you, we’ve irreversibly transformed the lives of 411,358 children, empowered 2,524 communities and strengthened 56 struggling projects.
This year, we aim to reach out to an additional 100,000 children.
Your vote will take us a step closer.
Cast your vote now
 

Wednesday, June 27, 2012

View CRY America's milestones in our 10 year journey of ensuring lasting change for children at http://america.cry.org/lp/10yrsmilestone/index.html

Thursday, May 24, 2012

Half a million children’s lives changed in a decade - CRY America celebrates its 10th anniversary

CRY America credits its 17,000 donors, 2,000 volunteers and 56 project partners for this success.

New York, May 19th, 2012 : CRY - Child Rights and You America Inc, a 501c3 non-profit organization that works to restore the rights of underprivileged children, especially in India celebrated its 10th anniversary by hosting two benefit dinners in New York and Seattle. ‘Uphaar 2012’ was held on May 5th, at Seattle’s Fairmont Hotel and ‘Pledge 2012’ was held on May 18th, at New York’s Taj, The Pierre.

Speaking at Pledge 2012, Shefali Sunderlal, President of CRY America said, “Today as we celebrate the 10th anniversary of CRY America, we are really celebrating the 411,539 children in 2,254 villages and slums across India, whose lives have been irreversible transformed through our collective efforts. We thank our 17,000 generous donors, 2,000 committed volunteers and 56 dedicated project partners and media supporters without whom, this change would not have been possible.”

Pledge 2012 was attended by 110 people from New York and New Jersey, while Uphaar 2012 was attended by 120 members from the western Washington community, who came together to partner CRY America’s work to benefit underprivileged children. Over $220,000 was raised across both dinner events, valuable resources that will be directed towards funding several projects to ensure lasting change for children. The events were attended by prominent personalities, Bobby Ghosh, Sree Srinivasan, Maneet Chauhan, Anu and Naveen Jain, Akthar and Alka Badshah, Leena and Sunil Shah.

Painting donated by famous Indian artists M.F. Husain and Murali Nagapuzha, an autographed guitar by Paul McCartney, baseballs signed by President Obama and Former President Clinton, signed Beatles album along with a private brunch by Chef Maneet Chauhan were auctioned by Sotheby’s Priyanka Mathew at the New York dinner.

In its 10 years of existence, CRY America’s work with projects has resulted in 119,987 children being immunized, 76,821 children provided with regular health check-ups, and 364 public health care centers activated. Further, 1,089 public schools have been activated and 501 villages in India are free from child labor today.

Bobby Ghosh, TIME Magazine’s Editor-at-Large, called for the global Indian community to take an active role in addressing issues like health and education for children, especially in a growing world power like India. “Investment in quality education for children is not only essential for a child’s development, but also for the growth of society and countries. Economic growth cannot be sustained unless nations and societies invest in social parameters like education and health for their children,” he said.

Celebrity Chef Maneet Chauhan said, "There is a saying that it takes an entire village to raise a child. I feel that CRY is that village. Each one of us should do our best possible to support CRY America to raise these children who are the future of this world."

18 year old Priyanka Jain compared her life to an 18 year old girl living in India who was married at a much younger age and deprived of opportunities. “We have the same dreams," she said. "She just wasn't given the opportunity to fulfill them. But by supporting organizations like CRY America, we have the power to change that."

David Bloss, Knight International Journalism Fellow, called for journalists to play a key role in bringing children’s issues to the forefront.

Since its inception a decade ago, CRY America has enabled people to take responsibility for the situation of underprivileged children. Sunderlal concluded, “If we all come together and address children’s issues with a sense of urgency, then no child will remain illiterate, malnourished or exploited.” She appealed for people to join CRY America as donors, volunteers and supporters and visit www.america.cry.org for more information.

Monday, April 16, 2012

You can ensure 834 girls Stay in School



As per the All India Education Survey 2002, “only half of India’s girls enroll themselves in school. While the remaining half drop out before they graduate Class 10”. The reasons being-

Early Marriage: In rural India, families live with modest means, and girl child education is hardly a priority. But marriage is. And since marriage brings the burden of domestic work and rearing a family, several girls are forced to drop out of school.

Child Labor: Facing abject poverty, parents often resort to sending their girls to work thereby ending their hopes of finishing school. This makes them bound to labor, with no hope of ever being independent.

Discrimination: Some families that can afford to send their children to school favour their sons over daughters, causing them to stay at home while their brothers attend school.

No Toilets: Lack of separate toilets for boys and girls is one of the leading causes for girls to drop out. The discomfort of sharing a toilet with their fellow classmates and teachers often compels them to give up on school altogether.

No Schools nearby: For many girls, their reason for dropping out is simple -the village school is just too far. Parents, worried for their safety, prefer to have them stay at home than risk traveling the distance alone.

We, at CRY America, strongly believe that when a girl is able to go to school, she sets off a cycle of positive change which gives her the strength and skill to fight gender bias and change the course of her life. Our recent initiative, ‘Stay in School’ campaign is about ensuring 834 girl children across 53 villages do not drop out of school and receive  quality access to education for a year. All we need is $30,000 to achieve it. 

Click here to support us. You can also help us reach out through Facebook and Twitter